Search
Related Links



    

Informative Articles

Get Stronger, Faster and Better by Training Right, Eating Well and Resting Up
Copyright 2005 Joey Atlas I rarely start an article with the conclusion at the beginning. But, for this specific topic I couldnít write it any other way. So, here it is. No magic pill, patented drink mix, sublingual tincture, trans-dermal patch,...

Oakland NJ - A Great Town for Kids
Oakland NJ - A Great Town for Kids My children, my wife and I have been fortunate to have lived in the town of Oakland NJ, for the past 18 years. The commitment to kids sports programs, especially girls softball, I think would be hard to surpass...

The Base Hit
The Base Hit © William A. Patsis 2004 Sometimes there is that rare moment that causes one to reflect on those matters that are deemed important and deflect those that are not. It is a very humbling experience but a nice feeling nevertheless. I had...

Total Bases
Total Bases This statistic fascinates me. For me it shows the difference between a slugger and a home run hitter. There have been players that have hit home runs that I do not consider good hitters. But when they are slugging, they get all...

Watching the NFL versus the MLB
Imagine placing two flat screen plasma TV's side by side in your living room smack dab in front of your couch. You've got beer, snacks a-plenty and fresh batteries in your clicker. One TV has an NFL game on and the other has a Major...

 
choosing a good Baseball Bat!

choosing a good Baseball Bat!

Ash

Most wood bats today are made from Northern White Ash generally harvested in Pennsylvania and Upstate New York. It is graded for quality with straight grain being the most important criteria. (Southern Ash grows too quickly and is not as dense). Major League grade is of course, the best and is also in short supply. Most of what you see that's labeled or sold as Pro-Stock or some similar name is actually Minor League wood or a lesser grade and generally is found for around $40. Of course, there are other levels of quality down to the $20. range. They are known by grades called high school, trophy and retail (don't expect to see the grades labeled). Generally, they are not of very good quality and only worth purchasing if money is an issue. (Better than not having any wood at all). You won't find these on our site. We only work with quantities in straight ash.

Maple

Here is another material that has recently gained some Major League


notoriety. They cost a bit more, but when made properly AND from the right material known as Rock or Sugar Maple, it is absolutely worth the extra money simply because it tends to outlast ash bats many times over. So in the long run, because they last longer, they're less expensive.

So why don't all major Leaguers use maple? Actually, as they are becoming more well known, more players are now using them. Just like in your own dugout, players will try out each other's new bats. And since they have such good "feel", some players will switch while other players having the superstitions that many ballplayers tend to have, will never change even the color much less the type of bat that they use. Also, since Major leaguers aren't concerned with saving money on bat breakage, economy is not the issue that it is for the rest of us.
About the author:

http://www.a1-baseball-4u.info/



Sign up for PayPal and start accepting credit card payments instantly.